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Table 2 List of objects and samples investigated and summary of the results obtained from the various techniques applied

From: The evolution of the materials used in the yun technique for the decoration of Burmese objects: lacquer, binding media and pigments

Samples Py(HMDS)–GC–MS GC–MS FORS Raman DM
Object 1a–f: series of plates (OA2000,0330.5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12)—late twentieth century
 Sample 1_black1: raw black lacquer Burmese lacquer, triterpenoid resin, lipids     
 Sample 1_black2: refined black lacquer Burmese lacquer     
 Sample 1_red: red paint Burmese lacquer, low lipids, Hg No proteins
No saccharide material
Low lipids
Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles of different dimensions
 Sample 1_green: green paint Burmese lacquer, low lipids, traces of proteins, As and S compounds Proteinsa
Saccharide material
Low lipids
Phthalocyanine green (CuC32Cl16N8) + phthalocyanine blue (CuC32H16N8) + yellow pigment Phthalocyanine green (CuC32Cl16N8) + phthalo cyanine blue (CuC32H16N8) + chrome yellow (lead chromate, PbCrO4) Few yellow and blue particles in a matrix of green particles
 Sample 1_yellow: yellow paint Burmese lacquer, low lipids, traces of proteins, As and S compounds Proteinsb
No saccharide material
Low lipids
Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + amorphous arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) Yellow particles of different size and shape
 Sample 1_black3: final black coating Well-preserved thitsi     
Object 2: tray (OA1996,0501.50)—1920s
 Sample 2_black: black lacquer Burmese lacquer, low lipids     
 Sample 2_red: red paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, Hg Proteinsa
No saccharide material
Lipids
Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles of different dimensions
 Sample 2_green: green paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, As and S compounds Proteinsa
Saccharide material
Lipids
Hooker’s greenc Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + Prussian blue (iron hexacyaniferrate, C18Fe7N18) Few yellow and blue particles in a matrix of green particles
 Sample 2_yellow: yellow paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, traces of proteins, As and S compounds Proteinsa
No saccharide material
Low lopids
Not conclusive Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + amorphous arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) Yellow particles
 Sample 2_pink: pink/orange paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, traces of proteins, Hg, As and S compounds Proteinsb
No saccharide material
Low lipids
Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) + natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + amorphous arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) Yellow and red particles in a matrix of orange particles
Object 3: small betel box (OA1998,7-23.140)—early twentieth century
 Sample 3_black: black lacquer Burmese lacquer, lipids, insecticide     
 Sample 3_red: red paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, insecticide, Hg   Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles of different dimensions
Object 4: bowl (OA1998,7-23.206)—mid/late nineteenth century
 Sample 4_black: black lacquer Burmese lacquer, lipids, proteins     
 Sample 4_red: red paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, Hg No proteins
Saccharide material
Lipids
Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles of different dimensions
 Sample 4_green: green paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, sugars, As and S compounds No proteins
Saccharide material
Lipids
Hooker’s greenc Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + Prussian blue (iron hexacyaniferrate, C18Fe7N18) Few yellow and blue particles in a matrix of green particles
 Sample 4_yellow: yellow paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, Hg, As and S compounds No proteins
No saccharide material
Lipids
Yellow pigment + cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + amorphous arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) + cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Yellow and red particles in an orange matrix
Object 5: coffer (OA1996,5-1.52)—early nineteenth century or before
 Sample 5_black: black lacquer Burmese lacquer, lipids     
 Sample 5_red: red paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, traces of proteins, sugars, Hg Proteinsa
Saccharide material
Low lipids
Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles of different dimensions
 Sample 5_green: green paint Burmese lacquer, lipids, As and S compounds Not determined aminoacidic fraction
No saccharide material
Lipids
Hooker’s greenc Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + Prussian blue (iron hexacyaniferrate, C18Fe7N18) Few yellow and blue particles in a matrix of green particles
 Sample 5_yellow: yellow paint Burmese lacquer, lipid, Hg, As and S compounds Not determined aminoacidic fraction
No saccharide material
Lipids
Yellow pigment + cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Natural orpiment (arsenic trisulfide, As2S3) + amorphous arsenic sulfide (AsxSy) + cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Yellow and red particles in an orange matrix
Object 6: large box (OA1998,0723.24)—eighteenth century
 Sample 6_black: black lacquer Burmese lacquer, lipids, proteins     
 Sample 6_red: red paint (external part) Burmese lacquer, lipids, proteins, Hg Proteinsa
No saccharide material
Lipids
Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles of different dimensions
 Sample 6_orange: orange paint (internal part) Burmese lacquer, lipids, proteins, phthalates Proteinsb
No saccharide material
Lipids
Not conclusive Cinnabar/vermillion (mercuric sulfide, HgS) Red particles in an orange matrix
  1. aLOD < value < LOQ
  2. bValue > LOQ (see “Other organic materials” section)
  3. cThe reflectance spectrum matches the profile of Hooker’s green [58], which is reported as a mixture of Prussian blue and gamboge. This was not confirmed by the other techniques, but the term Hooker’s green is here used to underline that this would have been the attribution if FORS alone had been used