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Table 2 Parameters of thermal denaturation of collagen in new vegetable tanned leathers and new parchment

From: Micro differential scanning calorimetry and micro hot table method for quantifying deterioration of historical leather

Collagenous material Tonset/°C Tmax/°C H/J g−1 T1/2/°C \(C_{{p , {\text{max}}}}^{ex}\)/J K−1 g−1
Calf leather
 Chestnut tannina 63.1 (2.1) 66.3 (0.9) 27.7 (2.2) 3.2 (0.1) 6.7 (0.2)
 Mimosa tannina 70.8 (1.0) 75.1 (1.1) 29.5 (2.4) 4.4 (0.2) 5.1 (0.2)
Sheep leather
 Chestnut tannina 66.5 (1.1) 69.1 (1.3) 26.8 (2.2) 2.4 (0.2) 8.6 (0.4)
 Mimosa tannina 70.5 (1.0) 73.6 (1.1) 29.6 (2.4) 3.4 (0.3) 7.3 (0.2)
Goat leather
 Chestnut tannin 66.8 (0.5) 71.7 (1.1) 26.5 (2.5) 2.8 (0.2) 6.9 (0.2)
 Mimosa tannin 76.6 (0.3) 79.6 (1.4) 28.2 (1.5) 2.9 (0.3) 7.2 (0.2)
 Vegetable leather 88.0b 90.0b 21.8b
76.3c 80.1c 11.5c
Parchment
 Calf 53.1 (1.3) 55.8 (1.8) 53.4 (5.0) 5.4 (1.2) 5.8 (1.0)
 Sheep 55.5 (0.6) 57.4 (1.0) 46.4 (2.4) 4.6 (0.4) 5.8 (0.5)
 Goat 55.1 (0.7) 57.6 (1.1) 47.5 (3.1) 3.6 (0.3) 5.6 (0.4)
  1. Literature data for new vegetable leathers are also reported
  2. Calf, sheep and goat leather and parchment were manufactured at INCDTP-ICPI, Bucharest. Uncertainty is the standard deviation. At least three measurements with fresh samples were performed for each leather/parchment type
  3. Literature data [15, 16] were obtained by performing DSC measurements at the rate of 10 °C min−1
  4. aRef. [29]; bRef. [15]; cRef. [16]